Re: losing connections to FCGI procs

Skip Montanaro (skip@automatrix.com)
Wed, 11 Dec 1996 18:41:57 -0500 (EST)

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 18:41:57 -0500 (EST)
From: Skip Montanaro <skip@automatrix.com>
Message-Id: <199612112341.SAA17323@dolphin.automatrix.com>
To: Nat Guyton <nat@dsg.com>
Subject: Re: losing connections to FCGI procs 
In-Reply-To: <199612111654.KAA24594@zeus>
 <199612111654.KAA24594@zeus>

>>>>> "Nat" == Nat Guyton <nat@dsg.com> writes:
    Nat> I also suggest turning on the sticky bit of your Perl executable (as
    Nat> root, "chmod 1755 perl") so that all instances of perl running will
    Nat> share the same space in memory, instead of each taking up their own.
    Nat> If anyone has reasons not to do this, I'd love to hear them.  Thanks,

I don't think this is necessary for most modern dialects of Unix.  I suppose
it can't hurt, but I doubt it will help either.

>From the sticky(8) man page on my BSDi system:

     An executable shareable file whose sticky bit is set will not be immedi-
     ately discarded from swap space after execution.  The kernel will hoard
     the text segment of the file for future reuse and avoid having to reload
     the program.  Shareable text segments are normally placed in a least-
     frequently-used cache after use, and thus the `sticky bit' has little ef-
     fect on commonly-used text images.

Hence, whatever interpreter you are using for CGI scripts (Python, sh, Perl,
tcl, ...) will almost certainly be left hanging around between invocations
if your system is at all busy.  In my case, my long-running database server
is written in Python, so it's always available.

Skip Montanaro     |       Musi-Cal:  http://concerts.calendar.com/
skip@calendar.com  |    "It doesn't matter where you get your appetite as
(518)372-5583      |    long as you eat at home." -- Sloan Wainwright